Our site uses cookies to improve the user experience and we recommend accepting its use to take full advantage of the navigation

A team of 200 priests comment on daily Gospel

View other days:

Liturgical day: Sunday 29th (A) in Ordinary Time

Gospel text (Mt 22,15-21): «Return to Caesar what is Caesar's, and to God what is God's». The Pharisees went out and took counsel on how they could trap Jesus with his own words. They then sent their disciples with the members of Herod's party for this purpose. They said to Jesus, «Master, we know that you are an honest man and truly teach God's way; you are not influenced by others nor are you afraid of anyone. Tell us, then, what you think: is it against the Law to pay taxes to Caesar or not?». But Jesus understood their evil intent, and said to them, «Hypocrites! Why are you testing me? Show me the coin with which you pay the taxes». They showed him a denarius, and Jesus said to them, «Whose head is this, and whose name?». They answered, «Caesar's». Then Jesus replied, «Therefore, return to Caesar what is Caesar's, and to God what is God's».

Illustration: Francesc Badia

Today, to put it this way, God defends His position: He does not want to trample us nor does He accept that we trample Him. How far does "Caesar’s" power reach? And where does God’s power begin from? How bad we are! We would even want to put a border between "I" and "God”!: Here is my freedom and there is your heaven ... God does not want to mix in our temporal affairs, but neither does He accept that we disregard his voice ... True, "I am free "; But it is also true that without God "I would not be free" ("I would not even be").

“God alone is God, and let God be God" (Benedict XVI).