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A team of 200 priests comment on daily Gospel

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Liturgical day: Monday 2nd of Advent

Gospel text (Lk 5,17-26): One day Jesus was teach­ing and many Pharisees and teachers of the Law had come from every part of Galilee and Judea and even from Jerusalem. They were sitting there while the power of the Lord was at work to heal the sick. Then some men brought a paralyzed man who lay on his mat. They tried to enter the house to place him before Jesus, but they couldn't find a way through the crowd. So they went up on the roof and, removing the tiles, they lowered him on his mat into the middle of the crowd, in front of Jesus. When Jesus saw their faith, he said to the man, «My friend, your sins are forgiven».

At once the teachers of the Law and the Pharisees began to wonder, «This man insults God! Who can forgive sins but only God?». But Jesus knew their thoughts and asked them, «Why are you reacting like this? Which is easier to say: ‘Your sins are forgiven’, or: ‘Get up and walk?’ Now you shall know that the Son of Man has authority on earth to forgive sins». And Jesus said to the paralyzed man, «Get up, take your mat and go home». At once the man stood before them. He took up the mat he had been lying on and went home praising God. Amazement seized the peo­ple and they praised God. They were filled with a holy fear and said, «What wonderful things we have seen today!».

«My friend, your sins are forgiven»

Fr. Joan Carles MONTSERRAT i Pulido
(Cerdanyola del Vallès, Barcelona, Spain)

Today, the Lord preaches and cures at the same time. Today we see the Lord teach those who considered themselves to be the more learned of their times: the Pharisees and the teachers of the law. We can sometimes think that because we live in the century we live in or because of the studies we have under our belt, there is little for us left to be learnt. This non-supernatural logic frequently leads us to think that God should fit into our way of thinking and not the other way around.

In the attitude of those who want their friend to be cured, we can see how resourceful we human beings can be when it comes to getting what we really want. What they wanted was something that was essentially good: that a sick person to be cured. But it is not enough. Our Lord wants a complete cure for us. And that's why he starts with what He has come to do in this world, with what his holy name means: to save man from his sins.

—My sins are always the deepest source of that which is bad in me: «My friend, your sins are forgiven» (Lk 5:20). Very often, our prayer and our interest is purely materialistic, but the Lord knows what we really need. The doctors' surgeries are full of sick people, just like they were in the times of Jesus. And like the people of that time, we run the risk of not going, with quite the same diligence, to where we can make a full recovery: to encounter the Lord in the sacrament of Penance.

It is fundamentally important for the believer to have a sincere encounter with the mercy of Jesus. He, rich in mercy, reminds us especially today that in this Advent we cannot forget the pardon He is more than willing to give us. And that if necessary, we must rid ourselves of the impediments —the roof— that prevent us from seeing him. —We all need to remove the tiles of our prejudices, of our comforts, of our worries, our lack of trust that is an obstacle to us setting our sights higher than the rooftops.