Our site uses cookies to improve the user experience and we recommend accepting its use to take full advantage of the navigation

A team of 200 priests comment on daily Gospel

View other days:

Liturgical day: Wednesday 26th in Ordinary Time

1st Reading (Job 9:1-12.14-16): Job answered his friends and said: I know well that it is so; but how can a man be justified before God? Should one wish to contend with him, he could not answer him once in a thousand times. God is wise in heart and mighty in strength; who has withstood him and remained unscathed? He removes the mountains before they know it; he overturns them in his anger. He shakes the earth out of its place, and the pillars beneath it tremble. He commands the sun, and it rises not; he seals up the stars. He alone stretches out the heavens and treads upon the crests of the sea. He made the Bear and Orion, the Pleiades and the constellations of the south; he does great things past finding out, marvelous things beyond reckoning. Should he come near me, I see him not; should he pass by, I am not aware of him; should he seize me forcibly, who can say him nay? Who can say to him, ‘What are you doing?’. How much less shall I give him any answer, or choose out arguments against him! Even though I were right, I could not answer him, but should rather beg for what was due me. If I appealed to him and he answered my call, I could not believe that he would hearken to my words.
Responsorial Psalm: 87
R/. Let my prayer come before you, Lord.
Daily I call upon you, o Lord; to you I stretch out my hands. Will you work wonders for the dead? Will the shades arise to give you thanks?

Do they declare your mercy in the grave, your faithfulness among those who have perished? Are your wonders made known in the darkness, or your justice in the land of oblivion?

But I, o Lord, cry out to you; with my morning prayer I wait upon you. Why, o Lord, do you reject me; why hide from me your face?
Versicle before the Gospel (Phil 3:8-9): Alleluia. I consider all things so much rubbish that I may gain Christ and be found in him. Alleluia.

Gospel text (Lk 9,57-62): As Jesus and his disciples went on their way, a man said to him, «I will follow you wherever you go». Jesus said to him, «Foxes have holes and birds of the air have nests; but the Son of Man has nowhere to lay his head». To another Jesus said, «Follow me». But he answered, «Let me go back now, for first I want to bury my father». And Jesus said to him, «Let the dead bury their dead; as for you, leave them and proclaim the kingdom of God». Another said to him, «I will follow you, Lord, but first let me say goodbye to my family». And Jesus said to him, «Whoever has put his hand to the plow and looks back is not fit for the kingdom of God».

«Follow me»

Fr. Lluc TORCAL Monk of Santa Maria de Poblet
(Santa Maria de Poblet, Tarragona, Spain)

Today, the Gospel invites us to mull over the central point of our faith, in a clear and insistent way: the radical following of Jesus. «I will follow you wherever you go» (Lk 9:57). How easily can one suggest something that may completely change a person's life!: «Follow me!» (Lk 9:59). Our Lord's words admitting no excuses, delays, conditions or betrayals...

Christian life demands this radical following of Jesus. Radical, not only because it must be guided, all the way, by the Gospel (hence, to the last days of our life), but, mostly, because all their aspects, from the most extraordinary to the most ordinary ones, want to be and must be the manifestation of the Spirit of Jesus Christ inspiring us. In fact, since the day of our Baptism, our life is no longer that of just any person: we carry with us, in our body, the life of Christ! Because of the Holy Spirit instilled in our hearts, it is no longer us who live, but Jesus Christ who lives within us. This is what the Christian life is like, because it is Christ’s full life, because it exudes Christ from his deepest roots: this is the life we are called to live.

When the Lord came to this world, «all mankind had its place, but He did not have one: He had nowhere to go amongst men (...), but to the barn, amongst the beasts, the animals, and the more innocent and unassuming people. This is why he says: ‘Foxes have holes and birds of the air have nests, but the Son of Man has nowhere to lay his head’» (St Jerome). The Lord will find his place amongst us, if we, as John the Baptist did, let Him grow while we lessen, that is, if we let grow He who already lives inside us, while being ductile and obedient to his Spirit, the source of all humility and innocence.